This lesson includes:

  • Tips for learning and teaching word formation to high-level learners, and information about corpus-based wordlists
  • A Student’s Worksheet that provides word families of the words consider and desire, followed by sentence-based word formation exercises
  • A Self-Study Notes page that provides answers to the word formation exercises, additional corpus-based lists of collocations and word patterns, etc.

This lesson includes:

  • Tips for learning and teaching word formation to high-level learners, and information about corpus-based wordlists
  • A Student’s Worksheet that provides word families of the words create, environment, and favour, followed by sentence-based word formation exercises
  • A Self-Study Notes page that provides answers to the word formation exercises, additional corpus-based lists of collocations and word patterns, etc.

This lesson includes:

  • Tips for learning and teaching word formation to high-level learners, and information about corpus-based wordlists
  • A Student’s Worksheet that provides word families of the words courage and heart, followed by sentence-based word formation exercises
  • A Self-Study Notes page that provides answers to the word formation exercises, additional corpus-based lists of collocations and word patterns, etc.

This lesson includes:

  • Tips for learning and teaching word formation to high-level learners, and information about corpus-based wordlists
  • A Student’s Worksheet that provides word families of the words commerce and merch, followed by sentence-based word formation exercises
  • A Self-Study Notes page that provides answers to the word formation exercises, additional corpus-based lists of collocations and word patterns, etc.

Middle English: the noun partly from Old French point, from Latin punctum ‘something that is pricked’, giving rise to the senses ‘unit, mark, point in space or time’, from pungere ‘to pierce or prick’—the source also of punctuation (mid-16th century), punctual (Late Middle English), punctilious (mid-17th century), puncture (Late Middle English), etc.; partly from Old French pointe, from Latin puncta ‘pricking’, giving rise to the senses ‘sharp tip, promontory’. The verb is from Old French pointer, and in some senses from the English noun.

Mid-16th century (in the senses ‘to take something into consideration’, ‘mention something before the proper time’): from Latin anticipat- ‘acted in advance’, from anticipare, based on ante- ‘before’ + capere ‘take’

Old English cnāwan (earlier gecnāwan ) ‘recognise, identify’, of Germanic origin; from an Indo-European root shared by Latin (g)noscere, Greek gignōskein (‘to know’, source of words such as agnostic), also by can and ken

Middle English enforme, informe ‘give form or shape to’, also ‘form the mind of, teach’, from Old French enfourmer, from Latin informare ‘shape, fashion, describe’, from in- ‘into’ + forma ‘a form’

error: © Word Atlas